The mistake in cooking eggs that damages health
May 13, 2024
cooking eggs

Although cooking eggs makes some nutrients more digestible, it can harm others.
Cooking eggs makes them safer to eat and also makes some of their nutrients more digestible.

An example is egg protein, which studies have shown becomes more digestible when heated.

More specifically, one study found that the human body can utilize 91% of the protein from cooked eggs, compared to only 51% from raw ones. This change in digestibility is due to heat causing structural changes in the egg proteins.

In raw eggs, the large protein compounds separate from each other and assemble into complex, twisted structures. When proteins are cooked, however, the heat breaks the weak bonds that hold them in shape. The proteins then form new bonds with other proteins around them. These new bonds in the cooked egg are easier for your body to digest.

An example is egg protein, which studies have shown becomes more digestible when heated.

More specifically, one study found that the human body can utilize 91% of the protein from cooked eggs, compared to only 51% from raw ones. This change in digestibility is due to heat causing structural changes in the egg proteins.

In raw eggs, the large protein compounds separate from each other and assemble into complex, twisted structures. When proteins are cooked, however, the heat breaks the weak bonds that hold them in shape. The proteins then form new bonds with other proteins around them. These new bonds in the cooked egg are easier for your body to digest.

You can see these changes happening as the egg white and yolk turn from thick jelly to elastic and firm.

The protein in raw eggs can also affect the availability of the micronutrient biotin. Eggs are a good source of biotin, which is an important nutrient used in the metabolism of fats and sugars. It is also known as vitamin B7 or vitamin H.

In raw eggs, a protein in the egg white called avidin binds biotin, making it unavailable to your body. However, when eggs are cooked, the heat causes structural changes in avidin, making it less effective at binding biotin. This makes biotin easier to absorb.

Where does cooking the egg go wrong?

On the other hand, however, one study found that cooking eggs reduced their vitamin A content by about 17-20%, while many sources testify that cooking can also significantly reduce the number of antioxidants in eggs.

One study found that common cooking methods — including boiling and frying eggs — reduced the number of certain antioxidants by 6 to 18 percent.

Overall, shorter cooking times (even at high temperatures) have been shown to keep more nutrients ‘alive’.

For example, research has shown that when eggs are baked for 40 minutes, they can lose up to 61% of vitamin D, compared to 18% when fried or boiled for a shorter time.

Cooking at a high temperature oxidizes cholesterol
Egg yolks are high in cholesterol.

More specifically, one large egg contains about 212 mg of cholesterol, which is 71% of the recommended intake of 300 mg per day. It is noted that there is no longer any recommended upper limit of daily cholesterol intake in the United States.

However, when eggs are cooked at high temperatures, the cholesterol in them can oxidize and produce compounds known as oxysterols.

Why is this a concern? But why oxidized cholesterol and oxysterols in the blood have been linked to an increased risk of heart disease.

Foods containing oxidized cholesterol and oxysterols are thought to contribute to blood levels of these compounds, and the main dietary sources of oxidized cholesterol may be commercial fried foods such as fried chicken, fish, and French fries.

It is also worth noting that cholesterol oxidized in the body is considered more harmful than oxidized cholesterol we eat.

But don’t forget: Studies have not shown a link between egg consumption and an increased risk of heart disease in healthy people!

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